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Andrea Stewart-Cousins Elected as the First Black Female Majority Leader of New York State Senate

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New York’s Senate has voted to elect Andrea Stewart-Cousins to be the first woman majority leader when the new session begins in January. The election which took place on Monday has made Andrea the first black woman to carry this honor. The former teacher and journalist has led the Democrats in the Senate since 2012 and will become the Senate’s next majority party leader.

During her speech, she stated the top priorities for her regime which will include enacting the Reproductive Health Act, strengthening gun control laws, and instituting early voting in New York. She further said she wants first to sit down and talk about all of the issues with her 15 new members.

Senate Democrats will have a remarkable 15 new members when the six-month legislative session begins in early January next year. The Republicans have held the position of majority leader for most of the last century. They have vowed to work with Stewart-Cousins.

 

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Black Excellence

Edith S. Sampson: The First African-American Delegate to the United Nations

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Edith Sampson, the daughter of Louis Spurlock and Elizabeth McGruder, was born on October 13, 1898, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was the first black woman to be elected as a judge in the state of Illinois.

In 1924, she opened a law office in Chicago to serve the local black community. In 1927, she became the first woman to earn a Master of Laws from Loyola University’s Graduate Law School.

On 24 August 1950, President Truman, the 33rd of the United States, appointed her as an alternate United States delegate to the United Nations. This made her the first African-American to officially represent the United States at the UN.

She became a member of the UN’s Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee, where she lobbied for continued support of work in social welfare. She died on October 8, 1979.

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Black Excellence

Loretta E. Lynch: The First African-American Woman Attorney General of the United States

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Loretta Lynch, who served under President Bill Clinton as the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, was born on May 21, 1959, in Greensboro, North Carolina.

She attended Harvard Law School and first earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and American literature from the school in 1981 and, later, a Juris Doctor in 1984. She married her husband, Stephen Hargrove, in 2007.

President Barack Obama nominated her on November 8, 2014, to succeed Eric Holder as Attorney General. She was confirmed as the attorney by the Senate by a 56–43 vote On April 23, 2015, making the first African-American woman to achieve the feat.

Lynch was sworn in on April 27, 2015, and went on to serve as the Attorney General from 2015 to 2017.

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Black Excellence

Michelle Robinson Obama: The First African-American First Lady of the United States

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Michelle Obama was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois, to Fraser Robinson and Marian Shields. The American lawyer and writer was the first African-American First Lady, being married to Barack Obama, the 44th U.S. President.

She met Obama at Sidley Austin LLP when they were among the few African-Americans at their law firm. She was to serve as his mentor while he was a summer associate. The couple married on October 3, 1992.

In 1991, Michelle left corporate law to pursue a career in public service. This was to enable her to fulfill a personal passion and create networking opportunities which later became beneficial to her husband’s political career.

She visited soup kitchens and homeless shelters in her early months as the First Lady. In 2009, she was named Barbara Walters’ Most Fascinating Person of the year. Michelle co-founded the Joining Forces program in 2011 to expand employment and educational options for veterans. The program also raised awareness about the difficulties plaguing military families.

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